Time of Use Pricing Plans

With a Time-of-Use Pricing Plan, your energy costs are based on how much energy you use and when you use it. Shifting chores like laundry and running your dishwasher outside the on-peak hours of 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. can reduce your monthly bill. It also means you can make better use of cleaner, renewable energy sources when they are more available to the power grid.

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TOU

How It Works

When you use energy is as important as how much you use.

With Time-of-Use pricing plans, energy prices are different based on the time of day.

Each day is broken out into different time periods:

  • $$$ On-Peak
  • $$ Off-Peak 
  • $ Super Off-Peak (TOU-DR1 and TOU-DR-P pricing plans only)

Energy costs are lower outside of the on-peak hours of 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. Plans like TOU-DR1 have a third time period, Super Off-Peak, on nights and weekends where you can save even more.

Time-of-Use Pricing Plans

Below are three Time-of-Use pricing plans for your home. These plans offer you more choices on how to better manage and control your energy costs.

The outlined pricing has been rounded for illustrative purposes. Visit Total Electric Rates for complete pricing schedules and additional pricing plan details. 

You may opt out of Time-of-Use pricing plans. To view additional pricing plans, click here.

 

This plan is for you if:

You can shift some of your electricity use away from the on-peak hours of 4 p.m. to  9 p.m. to take advantage of lower pricing during off-peak and super off-peak times.

Winter Season Pricing
November 1 - May 31

Prices effective March 1, 2021

winter pricing DR1 chart

The outlined pricing has been rounded for illustrative purposes. Visit ‘Total Electric Rates’ for complete pricing schedules and additional pricing plan details. 

*Holidays:   New Year's Day, President's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day.

Plan Details

  • Three time periods: on-peak, off-peak and super off-peak.
  •  Prices are lower before 4 p.m. and after 9 p.m. 
  • Not subject to High Usage Charge.
  • Includes baseline allowance.
  • Requires one year commitment.

This plan is for you if:

You can shift some of your electricity use away from the on-peak hours of 4 p.m. to  9 p.m. to take advantage of lower pricing during off-peak times.

Winter Season Pricing
November 1 - May 31

Prices effective March 1, 2021

Winter DR2 Pricing Chart

The outlined pricing has been rounded for illustrative purposes. Visit ‘Total Electric Rates’ for complete pricing schedules and additional pricing plan details. 

Plan Details

  • Two time periods: on-peak and off-peak.
  • Prices are lower before 4 p.m. and after 9 p.m.
  • Not subject to  High Usage Charge.
  • Includes  baseline allowance.
  • Requires  one year commitment.

This plan is for you if:

  • You can shift some of your electricity use away from the on-peak hours of 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.
  • You can take advantage of lower pricing during off-peak and super off-peak times.
  • You can commit to reducing energy on Reduce Your Use event days. 

 

Winter Season Pricing
November 1 - May 31

Prices effective March  1, 2021

Winter Pricing TOU Plus Pricing Chart

The outlined pricing has been rounded for illustrative purposes. Visit ‘Total Electric Rates’ for complete pricing schedules and additional pricing plan details. 

*Holidays:   New Year's Day, President's Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day.

Reduce Your Use (RDU) Days may be called when energy use and demand on the grid are high. The RYU Event Period Adder ($1.16) is an additional charge that will be billed to customers from 2:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. during a RYU Event Day. The RYU Event Period Adder is not applicable during non-RYU Event Days.

Plan Details

  • Three time periods: on-peak, off-peak and super off-peak.
  • Electricity costs less before 4 p.m. and after 9 p.m., except on Reduce Your Use event days, when prices are higher between the hours of 2 p.m. and 6 p.m.
  • A maximum of 18 Reduce Your Use event days can be called each year, typically in the summer when demand for energy is higher.
  • Includes baseline allowance.
  • Not subject to High Usage Charge.
  • Requires one year commitment.

How to be successful on Time-of-Use

No matter the size of your household, small changes in the way you use energy can help reduce your energy bill. There are  many ways to save throughout your entire home. Here are some examples.

For the average household, about 5 percent of its energy bill is dedicated to lighting. When it comes to energy efficient lighting, there are many choices. Look for light-emitting diodes (LEDs), compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and halogen incandescents. For outdoor lighting that is left on for long periods of time, use CFLs or LEDs as they will save energy. Replacing your home’s five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with ENERGY STAR ® rated models could save you $45 a year.

Source: Dept of Energy

On average, the number of electronics in the typical U.S home is now almost 30, and most of them need to be plugged in to charge. Ensure electronics are powered off when not in use and unplug any battery chargers or power adapters when not actively charging. Using power strips as a central point to reduce unnecessary power usage can also help you conserve energy. 

Source: Edison Electric Institute

Screen savers for computers save your screen, but don’t save energy. Make sure the screen saver does not deactivate your computer’s sleep mode. You can set the computer to operate the screen saver, then go into the sleep mode. If you aren’t going to use your computer for more than 20 minutes, turn off your monitor. If you aren’t going to use your computer for more than 2 hours, turn off your monitor and central processing unit (CPU). It takes more energy to have your computer running than the energy it takes to start it.

 

Source: Edison Electric Institute

Water heating is the second largest energy expense in your home, second only to heating/cooling. There’s a spectrum of options whether you’re able to cut out those extra few minutes in the shower or washing your clothes in cold water to investing in a new energy efficient water heater. Start here for more options: https://www.energy.gov/energysaver/heat-and-cool/water-heating.

Check out the rebates available at sdge.com/rebates.

Before using your dishwasher, be sure it’s full but not overloaded. Many dishwashers have the option to select 'air drying' or 'heated drying'. The air-drying setting will use less energy. Consider running your dishwasher before 4 p.m. or after 9 p.m. If you’re in the market for a new dishwasher, look for one with the ENERGY STAR® label as they are almost 10% more energy efficient than the current federal standards.

If possible, purchase an ENERGY STAR ® rated room air conditioning unit. They are 5-10 percent more efficient than current federal standards. If you’re using the unit to cool a bedroom before sleeping, waiting until after 9 p.m. to start cooling for the night can help you save money.

Source: Edison Electric Institute

You can save as much as 10 percent a year on your energy bill by turning your thermostat back 7-10 degrees for 8 hours a day from its normal setting. Installing a programmable thermostat in your home will let you automatically adjust the temperature during on-peak hours. Check out the rebates available at: https://sdge.com/rebates .

Source: Dept of Energy

If you’re in the market for a new washer, look for ENERGY STAR® washers. They typically use 20% less energy than washers that meet the minimum federal standards and use 30% less water than their non-ENERGY STAR counterparts. Consider scheduling your laundry before 4 p.m. or after 9 p.m. Check out the rebates available at sdge.com/rebates.

Source: Edison Electric Institute

We have pricing plans specifically for electric vehicle drivers, including a plan just for charging your electric vehicle or if you prefer, plans for both your home and electric vehicle. Start here: sdge.com/evplans.

A variable speed pump can reduce energy use by 30-45%. In addition, a heat pump can save up to 80% in energy use compared to a gas heater.

Source: Dept. of Energy

Frequently Asked Questions

You can save money  if you're able to shift some of your energy use outside the peak hours of 4 pm to 9 pm. 

Small shifts in how you use electricity during the summer can make a big difference. If you use large amounts of energy due to air conditioners, pool pumps and other energy hogs, you can lower your monthly bill by shifting as much of your usage as possible outside the peak hours of 4 pm to 9 pm. 

We're not asking our customers to change their lifestyles or turn their  schedules upside down. We encourage our customers to carry on with their daily routines, but we are asking them to look for ways to shift  the usage of large appliances, such as the washer and dryer,  electric vehicle charging and  the dishwasher to lower-cost hours.

The Time-of-Use holidays are:

  • New Year's Day (January 1)
  • President's Day (third Monday in February)
  • Memorial Day (last Monday in May)
  • Independence Day (July 4)
  • Labor Day (first Monday in September)
  • Veterans Day (November 11)
  • Thanksgiving Day (fourth Thursday in November)
  • Christmas Day (December 25).

When a holiday listed above falls on Sunday, the following Monday is recognized. No change will be made for holidays falling on Saturday.

Solar (or Wind) System Time-of-Use FAQs

You can save money  if you're able to shift some of your energy use outside the peak hours of 4 pm to 9 pm. 

You made a great decision to get a solar or wind energy system. When it comes to your pricing plan options, there are a few items to consider, including overall energy usage, size of your system and the date your system was installed. Most importantly, think about your monthly usage and your household habits. If you're able to shift some of your energy use outside of the hours of 4 p.m. to 9 p.m., a Time-of-Use plan may work for you. If you own an electric vehicle then one of SDG&E’s electric vehicle, Time-of-Use plans could be even better for you.

We're not asking our customers to change their lifestyles or turn their  schedules upside down. We encourage our customers to carry on with their daily routines, but we are asking them to look for ways to shift  the usage of large appliances, such as the washer and dryer,  electric vehicle charging and  the dishwasher to lower-cost hours.

The Time-of-Use holidays are:

  • New Year's Day (January 1)
  • President's Day (third Monday in February)
  • Memorial Day (last Monday in May)
  • Independence Day (July 4)
  • Labor Day (first Monday in September)
  • Veterans Day (November 11)
  • Thanksgiving Day (fourth Thursday in November)
  • Christmas Day (December 25).

When a holiday listed above falls on Sunday, the following Monday is recognized. No change will be made for holidays falling on Saturday.