Industry Segments

A Guide to Savings for your Business

Welcome to the new guide to savings for your business. We’re excited about the new design and hope that you’ll find new areas that provide savings for your business.

To begin please click the arrows below to scroll through our list of industries. Click on the image of the industry that you’d like to explore as you scroll.

Select your Industry

  • Retail

    Did you know? Retail businesses can increase their net profits by as much as 1.26% when they reduce their energy use by 10%. Check out the ways you can help your retail business.

    Retail Energy Usage Facts

    •  
      51%
      Lighting
    •  
      16%
      Cooling
    •  
      13%
      Misc
    •  
      11%
      Ventilation
    •  
      9%
      Refrigeration

    Your Energy Dollars

    Retail buildings in the U.S. use an average of 14 kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity and 31 cubic feet of natural gas per square foot annually. In a typical retail building, lighting, cooling, and heating represent about 60 percent of total use, making those systems the best targets for energy savings.*

    Retail Fact Sheet PDF
    Download

    Financial Incentives

    For a list of financial incentives visit http://www.sdge.com/rebates-finder/business and select the area that you would like to explore.

    Did you know?

    Lighting is critical, both in creating ambiance and in making the merchandise attractive to shoppers. High-quality lighting can reduce energy bills and drive higher sales.

    Fluorescent lamps

    If your establishment uses T12 fluorescent lamps or commodity-grade T8 lamps, relamping with high-performance T8 lamps and electronic ballasts can reduce your lighting energy consumption by 35 percent or more. Adding specular reflectors, new lenses, and occupancy sensors or timers can double the savings. Paybacks of one to three years are common.

    Display Lighting

    Proper display lighting, such as track lighting, is critical for driving retail sales and preventing merchandise returns. Energy efficient options include compact fluorescent, metal halide, and light-emitting diode (LED) track or spot lights. Retail accent lighting is a growing area for LEDs because they provide the ability to vary color, create sparkle, and aim the light precisely.

    If you would like to see the current rebates on all lighting equipment, please click here

    Resources & Trainings

    Trainings & Seminars


    Currently we have no trainings, but we are constantly adding seminars and trainings. Please check back or click here to be added to our mailing list.

    Tips & Testimonials

    “The old bulbs (more than 400 halogen) were so hot we didn’t even realize that we never ran our heat in the winter.” - Howard Haimsohn, Lawrance Furniture

    Quick fixes:

    Regularly cleaning and servicing your HVAC system can help prevent costly heating and cooling bills.

    Check air-conditioning temperatures

    With a thermometer, check the temperature of the return air going to your air conditioner and then check the temperature of the air coming out of the register that is nearest the air-conditioning unit. If the temperature difference is less than 14° Fahrenheit (F) or more than 22°F, have a licensed technician inspect your air-conditioning unit.

    Check cabinet panels on rooftop units

    On a quarterly basis (or after filters are changed), make sure the panels to your packaged rooftop air-conditioning unit are fully attached, with all screws in place and all gaskets intact so that no air leaks out of the cabinet. Chilled air leaking out can cost $100 per rooftop unit per year in wasted energy.

    Keep door closed

    Many retail outlets keep their doors open on hot days, with the air conditioner running, as a way of attracting customers. However, that practice can increase air-conditioning costs significantly. Alternatives to an open door include posting a sign that says it’s cool inside, or installing two sets of doors and leaving only the outer one open.

    Customer Testimonials
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    Lawrance Furniture Video

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LZXY3ESZLt0
  • Property Management

    Did you know? Reducing energy consumption is one way to improve both the profitability and value of any property. To illustrate the benefits of such improvements, the National Apartment Association (NAA) developed a scenario in which a property manager of a typical 20-unit apartment community with an annual operating income of $98,000 retrofitted common-area lighting and upgraded the laundry room. Just these changes increased annual net operating income by $3,000 and increased the property value by $46,154 (assuming a 6.5 percent capitalization rate).

    Property Management Energy Usage Facts

    •  
      26%
      Lighting
    •  
      22%
      Cooling
    •  
      20%
      Misc
    •  
      17%
      Ventilation
    •  
      15%
      Office Equipment

    Your Energy Dollars

    There are still plenty of opportunities for property managers to reduce energy consumption and improve the bottom line for their properties and clients. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates that, as of 2005, multifamily units accounted for 15 percent of U.S. energy consumption, and that owners and tenants pay over $30 billion a year to purchase that energy. According to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), utilities typically are 25 to 35 percent of overall operating costs, making them the single largest controllable cost in multifamily housing.

    Retail Fact Sheet PDF
    Download

    Financial Incentives

    Consider the following energy-saving tips

    Track your energy use

    Use the Energy Star program’s Portfolio Manager to track your buildings’ energy consumption (if you need help, Energy Star has created a quick reference guide specifically for multifamily housing). Once you’ve entered basic data such as building floor area and utility bill data, this tool calculates an index of energy consumption per square foot that will enable you to compare individual buildings, either across your portfolio or against their past performance. Armed with such comparisons, you can identify and prioritize the buildings with the biggest energy consumption problems, or track your progress for those buildings in which you’ve implemented energy-efficiency measures.

    Install lighting controls

    Install timers in areas where occupancy is predictable and occupancy sensors where it’s not. Install two-level lighting—which lowers light levels during low-usage times, when less light is sufficient—for corridors, stairways, or other areas that need to have the lights on 24/7. Check with building codes to determine what areas require 24-hour lighting. If you would like to see the current rebates on all lighting equipment, please click here

    Upgrade HVAC equipment upon replacement.

    Prepare for replacement of failed HVAC equipment now. Contact suppliers and ask them to recommend high-efficiency replacements for aging equipment so that when the time comes you can quickly specify the equipment you want. New cooling equipment sometimes may be sized smaller than the original equipment if efficiency measures have reduced energy consumption and heat loads. Retain an engineer to do sizing calculations. Document the specifications for replacement equipment so that they can be readily accessed and updated every few years.

    Upgrade water heaters upon replacement

    Plan for water heater replacements as you would the replacement of HVAC equipment. For multiunit systems with gas heating, upgrade to condensing water heaters, which can reduce water heating bills by about 30 percent, according to the DOE. For single-unit installations, a tankless water heater might be a good way to go. Where electric water heating is used, under some circumstances, a heat pump water heater can cut energy consumption in half. Energy Star maintains a list of high-efficiency products, including a variety of water heater types; it also provides estimates of how much you can save with Energy Star-qualified products.

    Resources & Trainings


    Trainings & Seminars


    Currently we have no trainings, but we are constantly adding seminars and trainings. Please check back or click here to be added to our mailing list.

    Tips & Testimonials 


    “Even better, this is setting the tone for sustainable construction throughout the entire Del Sur community. We’re taking what we’ve learned at The Ranch House and making it a standard practice. That’s the way we move forward.” Bill Dumka, Senior Vice President of Black Mountain

    Manage vacant units

    Turn off breakers where freezing and security are not a concern, turn heating and cooling off or down to minimal temperature settings, adjust refrigerators and freezers to their warmest settings, and turn off water heaters. Regularly review vacant units’ energy bills to identify unnecessary energy use and walk through them to ensure that lights and thermostats are off and that windows and blinds are closed.

    Lower the settings on water heaters

    Turning down water heater settings by 10° Fahrenheit (F) can decrease heating energy costs by 3 to 5 percent, according to the DOE. Take care, though, that you do not expose your tenants to excessive risks regarding Legionnaire’s disease. Legionella bacteria are widely present in potable water systems. To minimize the risk of contagion, ASHRAE (the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers) recommends that water heaters be set at 140°F in high-risk situations (for example, nursing homes, but presumably anywhere that residents with compromised immune systems are present) and 120°F in all other situations.

    Adjust pool and hot tub temperature

    The American Red Cross recommends 78°F as the optimal pool temperature. Set hot tubs to 96°F during warmer months and no higher than 102°F during cooler months.

    Start, Stop, Move Service - Please contact our Business Call Center at 1-800-336-7343.

    Service & Meter Request

    Continuity of Service/Return to Owner Agreements - Maintain uninterrupted gas and electric service while a rental unit is vacant.

  • Restaurants

    Restaurants in the U.S. have one of the greatest energy intensities of any type of commercial building—an average of 38 kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity and 111 cubic feet of natural gas annually per square foot (ft2). A number of opportunities for saving energy can often be found in the end-use areas that consume the most energy. In a typical restaurant, cooking, water heating, refrigeration, and space heating represent almost 80 percent of total use, making those systems the best targets for energy savings.

    Restaurant Energy Usage Facts

    •  
      35%
      Food Preparation
    •  
      28%
      HVAC
    •  
      18%
      Sanitation
    •  
      13%
      Lighting
    •  
      6%
      Refrigeration

    Your Energy Dollars

    This chart shows where the most energy is used in a typical restaurant. HVAC, cooking and refrigeration account for over 70% of energy use. In addition, 78% of gas used goes to cooking and 20% goes to water heating.


    Retail Fact Sheet PDF
    Download

    Financial Incentives

    Our Restaurant and Food Service programs offer many ways to manage energy costs and save money.

    Test Demonstration Kitchen - Explore the latest in energy-efficient food service equipment at our Energy Innovation Center.

    High-efficiency kitchen equipment

    Cooking equipment, coolers, and dishwashers are energy hogs in a restaurant—high-efficiency cooking equipment can be 15 to 30 percent more energy-efficient than standard equipment. The benefits of purchasing an energy-efficient model go beyond energy savings, as well: The same measures that make the units more efficient can also lead to better performance.

    Connectionless steamers.

    Replacing inefficient steam cookers represents one of the most substantial opportunities for energy savings in a commercial kitchen. There are an estimated 205,000 compartment steamers in food service operations nationwide. Of these, most are traditional units that rely on a boiler to vaporize a constant inflow of water. The FSTC estimates that 60 percent of the current compartment steamers in use—or 123,000 units—waste enough water and energy to warrant replacement. Self-contained, or “connectionless,” steamers provide the most efficient alternative to conventional units, and they offer combined annual water and energy savings of up to $6,000 per machine.

    Induction cooking. 

    Cooking energy consumption can be reduced 10 to 20 percent by using an induction cooktop rather than a conventional cooktop. That’s because induction cooking transfers 85 to 90 percent of the energy directly into the cooking pan, compared to gas cooking or electric cooking which are only about 55 or 70 percent efficient respectively. Because they’re more efficient, induction cooktops generate less ambient heat, which can reduce cooling bills, create a more comfortable kitchen environment, and eliminate safety issues associated with open-gas flames or hot electric surfaces. Induction cooking also heats food more quickly than gas, provides very stable cooking temperatures, and the cooking surfaces are easier to clean than those for conventional stoves.

    SDG&E Food Service Rebate Catalog 

    California Food Service Rebate Fact Sheet

    Resources & Trainings

    Articles TBD

    Trainings & Seminars

    Currently we have no trainings, but we are constantly adding seminars and trainings. Please check back or click here to be added to our mailing list.

    Tips & Testimonials

    “By buying new high-efficiency combination ovens and fryers, I was able to triple my food production without increasing my energy costs. We received $3,500 in rebates from SDG&E.” Phil Pace, Owner Phil’s BBQ

    Repair water leaks.

    A cold water leak that loses 0.2 gallons per minute will waste more than 100,000 gallons over the course of a year and cost a restaurant $700 in water alone. If a restaurant has a similar-sized hot water leak, the cost can be as much as $1,700 for wasted water and energy every year.

    In the kitchen. 

    Encourage your staff to use good operating habits and turn kitchen equipment off when not in use. For example, fryers sit idle more than 75 percent of the time, even in busy quick-service restaurants. You can save a lot of energy and money by turning off your backup fryer when you don’t need it. Eliminating just four hours per day of idle fryer time could save up to $150 per year. Likewise, if you turn off an idle broiler for just one hour per day you can save up to $400 per year in energy costs. 

    Dishwashing equipment. 

    Turning off high-temperature dishwashers at night so that built-in burners or heating elements will not consume energy can save about $500 per year (at an electricity rate of $0.13/kWh). Turning the dish machine exhaust hood off can save another $250 per year. Make sure that the booster heater is shut off at night for a savings of $60 per year—even if you turn off the dishwasher itself, the booster heater might have a separate manual switch.

    Customer Testimonials
    Bull Chicks Restaurant -- SDG&E Small Business Success Story

    Bull Chicks Video

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1wcKFhnRr0
    5nDqbLfK1VU

    Toronado Video

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5nDqbLfK1VU
    Eastlake Tavern+Bowl - SDG&E Small Business Success Story

    Eastlake Tavern & Bowl Video


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OA2v22y62T4
  • Grocery

    We know your business is driven by food quality, safety and customer appeal. That’s why we have developed energy management solutions with your specific needs in mind. Grocery stores in the U.S. use an average of 52.5 kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity and 38,000 Btu of natural gas per square foot annually. In a typical grocery, refrigeration and lighting represent about 47 percent of total use, making these systems the best targets for energy savings. Energy costs account for 15 percent of a grocery store’s operating budget. Because grocery stores’ profit margins are so thin—on the order of 1 percent—every dollar in energy savings is equivalent to increasing sales by $59.

    Grocery Store Energy Usage Facts

    •  
      59%
      Refrigeration
    •  
      23%
      Lighting
    •  
      6%
      Cooling
    •  
      6%
      Ventilation
    •  
      6%
      Misc

    Your Energy Dollars

    This chart shows where the most energy is used in an average grocery store.  Refrigeration and lighting account for over 80% of energy use.

    Retail Fact Sheet PDF
    Download

    Financial Incentives

    Technical Assistance and Technology Incentives - Get engineering assistance to reduce your energy demand with SDG&E's demand response or reliability programs.

    Optimize Refrigeration

    The optimization of refrigeration systems can reduce energy use by 24 percent relative to standard practice. The following are examples of measures that yield large savings.

    Display case shields.

    Aluminum display-case shields can reduce refrigeration load from the display case by 8 percent when applied overnight and by 40 percent when applied over a 24-hour holiday, relative to the load present without the shield. Products are kept colder when the shields are attached and remain colder for several hours after the shields are removed.

    Evaporator-fan motors.

     Replacing existing shaded pole motors on evaporator fans with electrically commutated motors will reduce the energy consumption of refrigerator and freezer cases by 40 to 70 percent. Drop-in replacement designs have made this retrofit relatively simple for a technician to perform. Additionally, most evaporator-fan motors in walk-ins run continuously even though full airflow is usually required only about half the time. Consider introducing advanced controls that slow the fans when full-speed operation is unnecessary. Annual cost savings can result in about a one-year payback for the total cost.

    Upgrade to More Efficient Lighting
    T8 Lamps.

    Lighting is critical to creating ambiance and making merchandise attractive to shoppers. High-quality lighting design can reduce energy bills and drive sales. If your facility uses T12 fluorescent lamps, relamping with high-performance T8 lamps and electronic ballasts can reduce your lighting energy consumption by 35 percent. Occupancy sensors or timers can add further savings in storerooms and other staff-only areas. Paybacks of one to three years are common.

    LED Display Case Lighting.

    Changing refrigerated display-case lighting to light-emitting diode (LED) light strips saves energy and has been shown to appeal to customers significantly more than linear fluorescent lamps. LEDs are more than 40 percent more efficient than T8 lamps, provide a more-even light distribution, are dimmable, and have a long lifetime.

    Resources & Trainings

    Article TBD

    Trainings & Seminars

    Currently we have no trainings, but we are constantly adding seminars and trainings. Please check back or click here to be added to our mailing list.

    Tips & Testimonials

    “Maintaining proper temperature of our refrigerated cases requires keeping the air moving. There are fans inside every case, and there can be up to 100 cases in a single store. We switched out our shaded pole fan motors and replaced them with electrically commutated motors (ECM). The retrofit of shaded pole fan motors to ECM fan motors will reduce fan motor electrical consumption by more than half.” Victor Munoz
Corporate Manager of Utilities and Energy Conservation, Vons

    Quick Fixes:
    Plugged-in devices.

    Computers, cash registers, bar-code readers, deli scales, and deli cooking equipment should be shut off when not in use. “Smart” power strips with built-in occupancy sensors are available to shut off plugged-in devices when no users are present.

    Add strip curtains to walk-ins.

     Simply adding strip curtains to the doors of a 240-square-foot walk-in refrigerator reduced the unit’s energy consumption by 3,730 kWh per year—about 9 percent of total consumption!

    Install occupancy sensors in walk-ins.

    By replacing light switches with low-temperature occupancy sensors, you’ll reduce lighting energy consumption by about half.

  • Manufacturing

    We know your business is driven by products and production output. On average, manufacturing facilities use 95.1 kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity and 536,500 Btu of natural gas per square foot annually, though actual consumption varies widely depending on the subsector. 

    Process heating, drivepower, cogeneration, and conventional boiler use generally consume the most energy in manufacturing facilities, regardless of subsector. Facility HVAC and lighting are the next-largest categories of energy consumers, and, though both account for less than 4 percent of total energy consumption, these categories offer proven improvement opportunities for energy efficiency that won’t interrupt plant processes.


    Manufacturing Energy Usage Facts


    •  
      28%
      HVAC
    •  
      23%
      Machine Drive
    •  
      16%
      Misc
    •  
      13%
      Lighting
    •  
      11%
      Process Heating
    •  
      9%
      Process Cooling

    Manufacturing Energy Usage Facts


    This chart highlights the biggest energy users for manufacturers in the computer/electronics product category (i.e. semiconductors).

    Note: Because the end-uses for energy can vary significantly in the manufacturing industry, this chart is only a representative sample for one category.


    Retail Fact Sheet PDF
    Download

    Financial Incentives

    Technical Assistance and Technology Incentives - Get engineering assistance to reduce your energy demand with SDG&E's demand response or reliability programs. Investment Solutions:

    Process heating is the largest energy consumer within the manufacturing sector, averaging almost one-third of facility energy consumption. Monitoring the heating process from start to finish and maintaining the equipment can have a large positive impact on facility energy costs. 

    Waste heat recovery.

     In most fuel-fired heating equipment, the largest heat loss occurs when spent combustion gases are exhausted, because these gases still contain a significant amount of thermal energy. This waste heat can be recovered and used in a variety of processes, including preheating combustion air before it enters the system, preheating load material before it enters the heating process, steam generation for secondary processes, and hot water or space heating.

    Motors are responsible for almost 70 percent of electricity consumption in the manufacturing sector. Proper maintenance, sizing, and overall system care can help eliminate waste losses.

    Use high-efficiency motors.

    Improve motor efficiency by rebuilding existing motors or by upgrading to new, higher-efficiency models. Rebuilding old motors can improve efficiency by a few percentage points. Motor shops will install new bearings, rewind the core, and “dip and bake” the motor (to keep the core electrically insulated). As of 2010, federal standards mandate premium-efficiency levels for virtually all new motors. Thus, although buying a new, high-efficiency motor may cost more than repairing an existing one, new motors can more than make up for the cost in energy savings, higher service factor, longer bearing and insulation life, lower vibration levels, and diagnostic maintenance systems. 

    Although compressed air is often viewed as an essentially free resource, these systems account for nearly 10 percent of overall electricity consumption and are often poorly designed or maintained.

    Match your supply to your load. 

    Generate compressed air at the pressure required and no higher—halving pressure can result in energy savings of more than 50 percent. Additionally, sequence your machines to ensure that, when the demand is at less than full capacity, one or more compressors are shut off entirely (instead of having several operating inefficiently at part load).

    Resources & Trainings

    Article TBD

    Trainings & Seminars

    Currently we have no trainings, but we are constantly adding seminars and trainings. Please check back or click here to be added to our mailing list.

    Tips & Testimonials

    Quick Fixes:

    HVAC temperature setbacks.

    If building temperatures are not controlled by an energy-management system, a programmable thermostat can increase energy savings and enhance comfort by automatically adjusting to preset levels. It can also lower temperatures on weekends and holidays.

    Leaks. 

    A leak in an HVAC rooftop unit can cost $100 per unit per year in wasted energy. On a quarterly basis, cabinet panels and ducts on rooftop HVAC equipment should be checked for leaks. A check should also be made to ensure that the units are secure, with all screws in place. On an annual basis, inspect all access panels and gaskets—particularly on the supply-air side, where pressure is higher.

    Condenser coils.

    Cleaning the condenser coil is one of the most cost-effective maintenance steps that can be done on HVAC rooftop units. A dirty coil that raises condensing temperatures by as little as 10° Fahrenheit (F; 5° Celsius [C]) can increase power consumption by 10 percent—resulting in about $120 in electricity costs for a 10-ton unit operating 1,000 hours per year. Condenser coils should be checked for debris on a quarterly basis and cleaned at least once a year.

  • Hospitality

    We offer hotels and motels financial incentives, design assistance, performance audits and training to help you achieve greater energy efficiency in your hospitality operations.

    Hotels and motels in the US use an average of 14 kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity and 49 cubic feet of natural gas per square foot (ft2) annually, according to the 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey. Most of the electricity these facilities consume is used for space cooling and lighting; typically, space heating represents the largest use of natural gas. Hotel and motel energy use will vary depending on the types of amenities available.

    Hospitality Energy Usage Facts

    •  
      36%
      Lighting
    •  
      21%
      Cooling
    •  
      18%
      Ventilation
    •  
      13%
      Misc
    •  
      6%
      Refrigeration
    •  
      6%
      Cooking

    Your Energy Dollars

    Ever wondered how your business uses energy? This chart shows where the most energy is used in the Hospitality Industry. Lighting and HVAC account for 75% of energy use..

    Retail Fact Sheet PDF
    Download

    Financial Incentives

    Investment Solutions:

    Ice machines.

     Since ice production is typically coincident with utility peak periods, there’s great demand-saving potential in scheduling production during off-peak hours. Energy Star–qualified icemakers with oversized storage bins can produce and store enough ice during off-peak hours to meet the daily demand, leading to a reduction in both demand and energy consumption.

    Outdoor lighting.

     For parking lots and outdoor applications, any incandescent or mercury vapor lighting should be replaced with something more efficient. High-pressure sodium and metal halide are the most common choices, but fluorescent or LED lighting can be more-efficient options. In parking garages, which often use inefficient high-intensity discharge fixtures, high-efficacy fluorescent fixtures can provide more-even illumination with fewer fixtures. Fluorescent lamps should be enclosed when used outdoors in cold climates. LEDs, on the other hand, perform well in cool temperatures and can cut energy use by 40 percent or more in certain outdoor applications, making them another contender for outdoor lighting. It used to be that LEDs were too expensive to be cost-effective in most applications, but those costs are coming down. Induction lamps are another possibility—they boast a very long life and are a good choice in hard-to-access areas

    Resources & Trainings

    Article TBD

    Trainings & Seminars


    Currently we have no trainings, but we are constantly adding seminars and trainings. Please check back or click here to be added to our mailing list.

    Tips & Testimonials


    “The high-efficiency lighting not only saves energy while producing the same levels of visibility, but also reduces a major source of heat, which in turn reduces the amount of energy required to cool the rooms.”

Vejay Seudath
Chief Engineer, Radisson Hotel, Rancho Bernardo

    Laundry. 

    Set laundry hot water temperatures to 120° Fahrenheit. This is a good temperature for all hot water uses outside of the kitchen, where codes are specific about water temperature.

    Pools and hot tubs.

    Make sure that all pools and hot tubs are covered after hours to diminish heat loss. Covering a heated pool can save 50 to 70 percent of the pool’s energy use, 30 to 50 percent of its makeup water, and 35 to 60 percent of its chemicals.

    Kitchen and food prep.

     In the kitchen, food preparation equipment should not be turned on for preheating more than 15 minutes before it’s needed; simply reducing the operating time of kitchen appliances can cut cooking-related energy consumption by up to 60 percent.